Author Researcher Speaker

Author Researcher Speaker

Author Researcher SpeakerAuthor Researcher SpeakerAuthor Researcher Speaker

Using good data, thoughtful analysis and a compassionate understanding

Ranked - EdWeek's Top 200 Education Professors

Bestselling Author

Dr. Toldson is the bestselling author of No BS (Bad Stats): Black People Need People Who Believe in Black People Enough Not to Believe Every Bad Thing they Hear About Black People.

Nationally Recognized Researcher

Dr. Toldson's has more than 100 publications. His research has been featured in The Washington Post, CNN.com, The New York Times, The Root, The National Journal, Essence Magazine, BET.com, The Grio, and Ebony Magazine.

Sought After Speaker

Dr. Toldson has been featured on MSNBC, C-SPAN2 Books, NPR News, POTUS on XM Satellite Radio, and numerous national and local radio stations. He has presented in 38 US states, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Scotland, South Africa, France, and Spain.

Reviews

Former Secretary Arne Duncan, National HBCU Conference

"Dr. Ivory Toldson, our new Deputy Director of the White House Initiative on HBCUs, is a prolific young scholar and myth buster. He has courageously debunked research and media coverage that perpetuates misleading stereotypes about African Americans. And he is a champion of increasing opportunities for black men, including teaching opportunities."

Cortland Milloy, WASHINGTON POST

“Look deeper into the dispiriting statistics about young black men and boys and you’ll find a rarely acknowledged beauty: an indomitable spirit and irrepressible desire to beat the odds. That’s what Howard University psychology professor Ivory Toldson revealed during a recent policy briefing.”

Ray Baker, EBONY MAGAZINE

"Dr. Toldson suggested instead of measuring Black student achievement against White student achievement, the comparison should be high achieving Blacks, to middle achieving Blacks, to lower achieving Blacks. He told the audience ‘we can’t look outside our culture or race for solutions."

Michel Martin, NPR

“Toldson had another point which was this: This representation of a crisis scenario too often leads to extreme and unhelpful solutions, including a dumbing down of the kinds of educational opportunities that are often directed to black boys, not to mention an ongoing stigma that even the most motivated and excellent students have to fight. He says this refusal to look at the data closely — to prefer a story over the facts — creates more problems than it solves.”

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Washington Post

"A new book with a mouthful of a title and an important message. The book, as the title suggests, addresses myths about black students and debunks with them data and logic." 


- Washington Post on No BS